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The Broken business model of EFL

There is an insightful article that was recently published in the EL Gazette about the broken business model of EFL schools in the US and the UK. While many teachers think of language schools as money makers that deliberately keep their teachers poor, this article blows that idea out of the water to show an industry that definitely is not making money the way it used to. Note too, that many of the problems the US and UK are facing also exist in Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Ireland.

Read more in the EL Gazette.

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Something else to feel bad about: the carbon footprint of international students

It is probably a good bet that a larger than average percentage of ELT professionals are concerned about climate change. Well, a recent article in Inside Higher Ed puts the spotlight on international education and the large carbon footprint that it has. Possible solutions are suggested – including students staying home – but that leaves ELT professionals between a rock and a hard place.

Read more on IHE.

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Pairing NESTs up with NNESTs for better outcomes (for students in China, at least)

The EL Gazette has an interesting article on a study that was recently published showing that student outcomes were better in Chinese classrooms when Native English Speaker Teachers (NESTs) and Non-Native English Speaker Teachers (NNESTs) collaborated and co-teach.

Read more in the EL Gazette. If you are a real nerd, read the actual study (paid).

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Group work makes local students unpaid tutors to international students

The EL Gazette reports on an Australian student, Meshal Laurie, who argues that with the group work projects they are required for their courses, the Australian students in her program are effectively required to tutor the international students in their groups in order to pass their courses. Similar stories have come out of the UK.

Read more in the EL Gazette.