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Computer edition of CAEL to be delivered in China

In the summer, Paragon Testing (a subsidiary of the University of British Columbia) announced that it had signed an agreement with the National Education Examinations Authority of the Chinese Ministry of Education to deliver the Canadian Academic English Test in the People’s Republic of China.

Read Paragon Testing’s news release.

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Vietnam the fastest-growing market for Canadian education sector

While the number of Indian students studying in Canada has surpassed the number of Chinese, the growth of Vietnamese students is stunning. 2017 saw an 89% increase, while 2018 saw another 46% increase over 2017 with over 20,000 students. The four year increase from 2015 to 2018 was 419%!

Read more in University World News.

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Female foreign students face sexual harassment

The Vancouver Sun reports that there are many female international students, particularly from the Punjab region of India, who are dealing with sexual harassment from landlords and exploitation from employers. These women come from a poor region and in many cases their family has sold everything they have to send them to Canada. While here, the money they came with often turns out to be insufficient and they feel the need to make additional money. They therefore often work more than their work permits allow, offer sexual services to landlords and get involved in the drug trade (this is true of male students as well). Afraid of being deported, they do not report these problems.

Read more in The Vancouver Sun.

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Indian students now outnumber Chinese on Canadian campuses

Last year, there were 172,000 Indian students with study visas in Canada while there were 142,000 Chinese students. The number of Chinese students last year was up by 30%, which points to the incredible resent surge of Indian students. The cheaper Canadian dollar helps, but more important is the greater ease in receiving work permits and a path to citizenship. Canada has Donald Trump to thank, partly at least, as the US is proposing stricter issuance of foreign-worker visas.

Read more in The Globe and Mail.

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Relying on international students is dangerous, says professor

With the recent diplomatic spats with China and Saudi Arabia, Canadian post-secondary institutions are increasingly aware of how vulnerable they are to global affairs. A professor at UPEI says that with 25% of their student body being international students from China, an escalation of tensions threatens the finances of the institution and the local economy. He makes the sensible argument that diversification is essential so that should one nation should cease to send students, universities and the local businesses that serve them will not be threatened.

Read more in The Journal Pioneer/ The Guardian.